Archive: Info

Company Spotlight: Amazon

English: Amazon warehouse in Glenrothes, Fife;...

With its undeniable popularity, there’s a strong chance that you’ve heard of little company called  Amazon.com (unless you live under a rock & this rock has no internet connectivity for some reason). In fact, it would be no exaggeration to say that Amazon  has become a household name synonymous with online shopping. Founded by Jeff Bezos in 1994, with initial start-up capital coming from his parents, Amazon originally  started out as an online bookstore. Modest ambition? Hardly. Bezos envisioned a diverse world of e-commerce the likes of which no one had seen; 19 years later his dream has come to fruition as Amazon.com has grown  drastically in both size & breadth. In fact, it has grown so much that it has become the world’s  largest online retailer. While they still sell books, Amazon now sells a huge  variety of products — games, electronics, clothing, music,  toys, groceries, and just about everything in-between.

Physical goods are not the end of it, however — Amazon boasts a significant presence in digital goods & next-ggn cloud services: its own online music & app store,  video streaming, S3 online storage, EC2 cloud computing & much more. Amazon also offers a huge selection of ebooks for quick & easy  downloading. It even produces its own consumer electronics, including the  increasingly popular Kindle Fire.

Not a buyer? If you’re more interested in selling products, Amazon will let you set up your own storefront at minimal cost. If you’re not a professional seller  (for example, if you sell only 40 items per month or less), Amazon takes a very reasonable $0.99 per sale. Professional sellers, on the other hand, can expect a hefty $39.99 per month fee. Amazon even has content creation covered, allowing people a platform to distribute their own publishing material. If you’re an aspiring author and can’t afford to produce  your own books, Amazon could provide you with a great avenue to start  making money by selling your material in e-book format.

Amazon’s versatility in product & distribution means that they hire only the best & brightest talent, in a variety of different job  positions. With its ever-growing popularity and large  range of services, it’s safe to say that Amazon will remain a household name & powerhouse employer for the foreseeable future.

Hottest Companies in NYC for Creative Women

Fashion by Rachel Ariel Photography

With Fashion Week kicking-off this week, all eyes are on NYC. For creative women looking for exciting careers that showcase their flair & style, the city that never sleeps unquestionably has a lot to offer.

If you’re a woman living in (or thinking of moving to!) New York, here are 4 of the hottest companies to work for today.

Gilt Group

Often referred to as the “Amazon of Luxury”, this NYC online fashion and lifestyle retailer has changed the way that people shop. Relying on a membership-only flash sale business model, its massive userbase make a mad dash to their computers everyday at noon to browse time-sensitive deals on stylish luxury products, which include popular fashion brands as Prada, Botkier and Derek Lam. Their mission statement is clear:

“Create the most exciting, curated shopping experience that helps our members express their style in life.”

Gilt Group has some uniquely named roles (buyers are called “curators”), whose qualifications include “a passion for fine food, wines, arts, culture and city life.” This unique fashion retailer creates an exceptionally inspiring working environment for the right candidate. (http://www.gilt.com/company/careers/jobs)

Moda Operandi

Moda Operandi brings the once-exclusive couture trunkshow to the masses. This premier fashion website redefines shopping in style, offering clients “looks straight from the unedited runway collections of the world’s top designers–months before they are available anywhere else.”

Founded by exceptionally talented & accomplished Áslaug Magnúsdóttir  (Icelandic superstar whos pedigree includes HBS, McKinsey, and a law degree). The company’s organization chart reads like a fashion magazine: where will you fit in? Roles include Trunk Show Producer, Editorial Assistant and Photographer, among others.  (http://modaoperandi.com/careers)

AHAlife

AHAlife describes itself as the discovery shopping destination for curated lifestyle products that span design, technology, fashion, media, food, beauty and travel. Each product is carefully selected by company curators, established names and experts in each of its selling categories. Its website features a carefully editorialized “stories” page, which sets it apart from your usual, run-of-the-mill e-commerce site.

Innovative, fashion forward and full of style, AHAlife currently has open positions in engineering, design and buying. (http://www.ahalife.com/jobs/)

Conde Nast

Conde Nast is a world-renowned publisher with magazines that span a wide scope of topics—including food, travel, fashion and style—and a wide range of brands—including GQ, Vogue, Conde Nast Traveller, Style.com and Vanity Fair.

It’s one of the oldest, too. But if you think that its traditional or boring, think again. People who work for Conde will tell you that its work environment is dynamic, inspiring and fast-paced; all made possible by the tremendous level of talent. And did we mention that about one-third of its employees are women?

Conde Nast is currently looking to fill positions in advertising, editorial and corporate. (http://www.condenast.com/careers/career-opportunities)

New look at Reverse Mentoring

Time to re-think the unilateral view of mentorship? Your direct reports are often more proficent than you are (in certain areas); leaders take note!

Reverse mentoring is just a fancy name for a relationship where a seasoned employee learns from a younger employee. You may already be doing it today.

Source: ROI of Reverse Mentoring

 

Google Interview Questions

Google Refrigerator

How many cows are there in Canada? How many tears are shed between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. in the southwestern United States? If you think these are just any old brain teasers, guess again. These are actual questions asked of Google applicants in the early stages of interviewing. They are likely on the “ban” list, but you’ll be sure to find equally diabolical ones during your interview.

Insanely difficult? Probably, but the best approach is to remember that they’re only partially judging you on your answer; how you answer these questions & your thought process behind it is infinitely more important.

If the probability of observing a car in 30 minutes on a highway is 0.95, what is the probability of observing a car in 10 minutes (assuming constant default probability)?

Source: Answers To 15 MORE Google Interview Questions That Made Geniuses Feel Dumb

Company Spotlight: Etsy

Image representing Robert Kalin as depicted in...

People have compared DIY haven Etsy to everything from “a crafty cross between Amazon and eBay”
to, more humorously, “your grandma’s basement.” Either way, the website strives to put the “personal”
back into e-commerce and effectively close the gap between producer and consumer — making it
possible for struggling students and stay-at-home moms alike to run successful online storefronts from
the comfort of, well, anywhere.

Wares include everything from handmade and vintage clothing to jewelry, artwork, and bath and
beauty products. There’s often special emphasis on environmentally-friendly creations that use recycled
materials, and quirky, one-of-a-kind items that offer distinct counterpoint to predictable, mass-
produced commercial goods. It costs less than a quarter ($0.20) to list an item, and Etsy takes 3.5% of
your final sale.

Ex-CEO Robert Kalin named the site Etsy because he “wanted a nonsense word [to] build the brand
from scratch. I was watching Fellini’s 8 ½ and writing down what I was hearing. In Italian, you
say ‘etsi’ a lot. It means ‘oh, yes.’ And in Latin, it means ‘and if.’” First launched in 2005 and primarily
promoted via word-of-mouth, Etsy has since become home to over 875,000 sellers who have brought in
over $525 million in sales.

Kalin saw Etsy “as a cultural movement that could revive the power and voice of the individual
against the depersonalized landscape of big-box retail” (Wired). In other words, there’s a very strong
emphasis on community and helping one another, sort of like a giant, friendly online craft fair. Or
as it’s explained on their official blog, “when you buy a gift from a seller on Etsy, you’re directly
supporting people in local communities all over the world while giving something uniquely special and
meaningful to someone you care about.”

Currently positions are open in communications, operations, and software engineering… and if you’re
still not convinced that this is the place for you, better check out the cozy corporate offices in Brooklyn.

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